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This Morning: Nick Ferrari discusses AstraZeneca vaccine

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Covid vaccination experts in the UK formed the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), and have since created a set of ten vaccine priority groups, splitting the population by age and vulnerability. In total in the UK, more than 31.8 million people have received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, with more than six million also receiving the second jab.

There are now three vaccines being issued in the UK, the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab, Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine and the latest addition – the Moderna vaccine.

The Moderna vaccine began being given this week, in the latest push to vaccinate all adults by the end of July.

The latest research from SAGE found scientists expect 2.7 million doses of the vaccine per week in England until the end of July.

But what does this mean for those yet to have their vaccine?

Read More: Covid vaccine update: Moderna vaccine may trigger more side effects

When will you get the coronavirus vaccine?

Government policy has mandated an approach which starts with the elderly and most vulnerable and moves down.

Health workers are currently focussed on the first of nine stages, prevacid capsule open achalasia swallow as they vaccinate care home residents aged over 80 and their carers.

The remaining eight will cover ages 75 to 50, with an exception for vulnerable children and younger adults.

In a bid to provide some clarity on the process, one creator on the site Omnicalculator created a tool to place people in a virtual queue.

Omni’s vaccine calculator, created by Steven Wooding, combines answers given by people online to provide a rough idea of how long they have to wait before their vaccination.

The tool asks people their age, whether they work at a care home or in healthcare, or are currently pregnant.

People also need to say whether or not they had to shield earlier this year, or if they have underlying health conditions.

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For example, by their calculations, a 34-year-old person with no health concerns has between 5,684,889 and 11,878,123 people ahead of them in the queue.

The calculator says the projected date for the first dose is between June 19 and August 15.

The calculations show most people will have to wait quite some time before they achieve immunity.

More than half of Brits may have to wait potentially another year to receive their jab, according to the National Audit Office (NAO).

They announced the Government secured 267 million doses of the vaccine, costing them £2.9 billion in total.

But it added the current plans from NHS England and NHS Improvement intend to vaccinate 25 million people “throughout 2021”.

Depending on how many people they manage to vaccinate this year, it could leave the remaining roughly 35 million people waiting until 2022.

Gareth Davies, head of the NAO, said “logistical challenges” would determine how quickly people will receive the jab.

He said: “Developing and securing an effective vaccine is central to reducing the impact of Covid-19 on society and saving lives.

“Government has worked quickly and effectively to secure access to potential vaccines, using the available information to make big decisions in an inherently uncertain environment.

“With one vaccine now approved for use and its rollout started, significant challenges remain.

“Efficient delivery to the UK population presents complex logistical challenges and requires excellent communication with the public.”

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