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Type 2 diabetes can be a 'devastating diagnosis' says expert

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Estimates state up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes which is yet to be diagnosed. It’s not always easy to detect diabetes symptoms and while it can go unnoticed, there are 10 key warning signs to look out for. Express.co.uk chatted to the experts at Nice RX to find out what these warning signs are and how you can reduce your risk of diabetes.

It’s really easy for diabetes to go undiagnosed, but it’s dangerous for that to happen.

Navin Khosla, Medical Writer at Nice RX said: “We often get asked for advice on how to spot diabetes early and what the preventative measures are.

“Although you cannot reverse the early symptoms of type 1 diabetes (as it’s an immune system disorder) it’s always important to get on top of it early and begin treatment.

“For type 2 diabetes, however, there are a lot of preventative measures that can be used so catching it early is very useful.”

Diabetes symptoms can come on slowly and the warning signs of diabetes can be difficult to recognize, especially if you have type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes symptoms usually appear and develop faster, azithromycin atorvastatin interaction but it can still take time to realize you have the condition.

The Nice RX site explains: “Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder caused by your immune system mistakenly attacking the beta cells in your pancreas that produce insulin, in turn lowering how much insulin you have in your body.

“It comes on quickly in most people, although the early signs of type 1 diabetes can be hard to spot or can be mistaken for something else at first.

“The condition most often emerges during childhood, so if you have diabetes in the family, you should watch for early warning signs of diabetes in your children.”

Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is caused by cells in your body becoming resistant to insulin (insulin resistance).

This means insulin stops working as well as it should, and your cells absorb less glucose from your blood. Sometimes your pancreas also begins to produce less insulin.

The Nice RX experts explained: “Insulin resistance is caused by a mixture of genetics and your lifestyle.

“Your genes can make it more likely that you will develop insulin resistance, but they do not guarantee it. Sometimes genetics is not involved at all.

“If you are at risk of diabetes or are otherwise worried you may be developing it, it is important to know what early warning signs to look out for.”

Top 10 diabetes warning signs

  • Tiredness – The cells of your body stop receiving as much glucose as they need.
  • Hunger – Your cells send signals saying they do not have enough glucose.
  • Peeing more often – One way for your body to remove excess glucose from your blood is for your kidneys to filter it out.
  • Thirst – Because diabetes makes you pee more often, your body loses more water.
  • Dehydration – a dry mouth, itchy skin: As your body loses more water than usual, you can get dehydrated.
  • Blurred vision – Having less water and fluids in your body can also cause blurring and other vision changes by making your eyes swell
  • Slow-healing cuts/sores – Diabetes can cause nerve damage which slows down how fast your body heals
  • Yeast infections – Both men and women can get outbreaks of yeast infections as the yeast feeds on excess glucose in areas of your body.
  • Type 1 Diabetes – unexplained weight loss, nausea and vomiting, sweet-smelling breath
  • Type 2 Diabetes – overweight or obese, store fat around your stomach, high blood pressure, high levels of bad cholesterol

How to reduce your risk

If you have any of the early signs of diabetes or any other reason to think you have diabetes, you need to see your doctor ASAP.

Diabetes is a serious condition that can harm your health and lead to severe complications, such as nerve damage, heart attacks, strokes, vision loss and blindness and the amputation of limbs

The good news is that diabetes can be treated and managed by making lifestyle changes and taking diabetes medications, like insulin.

You can also reduce your risk of developing diabetes by doing the following:

  • Cut sugar and refined carbs from your diet
  • Work out regularly
  • Quit smoking
  • Lose excess body fat
  • Drink water as your primary beverage

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