2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic Debuts With 563 HP, RWD, And A Manual

The 2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic isn’t merely classic thanks to a cool ducktail spoiler and some graphics. Inside the cockpit, you’ll find no paddle shifters. There are three pedals at your feet, with a stick shift in the center console. There’s no automatic option. There’s no all-wheel-drive option. And the driver has 563 horsepower to handle, making it Porsche’s most powerful manual-transmission car in the lineup.

As such, some might call the new 911 Sport Classic an analog supercar in the digital world. That’s exactly what Porsche Special Projects Director Grant Larson called the latest 911 during a conference call with media, outlining details of the Sport Classic. You might also call it a 911 Turbo S with a manual, because the Sport Classic is based on that car with the wider stance, and yes, the same 3.7-liter twin-turbocharged flat-six engine, albeit detuned. Power goes exclusively to the rear wheels, and you also get ceramic brakes, dynamic chassis control, rear-axle steering, and the active suspension management system all standard.

Incorporating the flared backside of the Turbo S into the Sport Classic was important for Porsche to give the car a vintage, widebody look. The ducktail spoiler also adds significantly to the classic design, paying homage to the much-loved 911 Carrera RS from the 1970s. The double-bubble roof is a callback to the 997-era Sport Classic. Porsche badging both outside and inside recalls some of the company’s earlier designs. And it’s impossible to miss the modern interpretation of classic Fuchs wheels, pumped up on the Sport Classic to 20 inchers in front, 21 inches at the back.

As you might imagine, the 911 Sport Classic includes many less obvious design features you won’t find on other models. The aforementioned roof is among them, made from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). The hood is also CFRP and not offered on the 911 Turbo. The fixed front lip spoiler and black LED-Matrix headlights are Sport Classic exclusives. Over-the-top striping most decidedly is a Sport Classic feature, as are the roundels with numbers on the doors. Buyers can choose any number between 1 and 99, or since it’s decals, they can be removed for a less-racecar look.

Given the 911 Turbo S engine at the back, you might be wondering about the lack of side vents on the Sport Classic. Designers wanted a smooth, unbroken surface, so new tooling was created to make widebody fenders without vents. Speaking to Motor1.com, Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur Director Boris Apenbrink explained that detuning the engine meant less air was needed. Engineers also reworked other air channels to further compensate for the missing vents, including ducts beneath the ducktail spoiler. The end result is a very clean widebody look that’s exclusive to the 911 Sport Classic.

The interior is also upgraded for the special edition 911. Semi-aniline leather is used for the first time since the 918 Spyder, where it’s combined with cloth seat inserts, cloth door panels, and wood trim to evoke a late 1960s-early 1970s ambiance. The analog tachometer is retro-styled, and you’ll find plenty of Porsche branding along with the Porsche Exclusive Manufaktur logo throughout the greenhouse. It’s also still a four-seater, as the aim for the 911 Sport Classic isn’t to be a hardcore track machine but a thoroughly enjoyable driver’s car.

Gallery: 2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic








And for the first time, drivers in the United States will have the chance to sample the 911 Sport Classic. 1,250 are planned for global production, though specific allocations for the US aren’t yet known. It will be offered in four colors, including Black, Agate Grey Metallic, Gentian Blue Metallic, or Sport Grey Metallic – a shade made specifically for the Sport Classic. Buyers will also be eligible to get a special Sport Classic-themed watch, though pricing for that or the car isn’t available just yet.

The 2023 Porsche 911 Sport Classic should reach dealerships in late 2022.

Source: Porsche

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